PlayStation VR

NASA has been using Sony’s upcoming PlayStation VR headset to train its space robots – the Robonauts. The prototype model that has been developed by the electronics major Sony is scheduled for launch in the first half of 2016.

Having the device strapped on your head, the PlayStation VR will allow you to get into the world of unimaginable reality; you can visit the planet of the apes, ride gigantic dinos, or even do anything that will not happen in real life. In short, you can travel in time machine visiting the dark side of the planet.

Playsation VRWith this amazing technology, NASA and Sony have put it in another way, developing Mighty Morphenaut, a Playstation VR demo. These guys have created a simulated space probe environment allowing its engineers to control a humanoid with VR. The simulated space shuttle allows its users to get used to a robot and have things done.

NASA has been working for ages on humanoid robots, leading to the evolution of Robonauts. These humanoids are specially designed to assist or replace humans in space. These Robonauts are engaged to do dangerous jobs in the International space station. In 2011, Robonaut 2 was launched successfully into space carrying these machines to the ISS, but operating them from thousands of mile distance is a complicated one. The scientists are still working on ways to operate them flawlessly from a distance.

The Mighty Morphenaut demo is powered by PS4 that allows users to wear the PlayStation VR headset over their face to look around and work with humanoids in real time. The humanoid follows the movements of the controller and then imitates it. But, considering the distance between space and base station, the lag between the two is inevitable, because the environment is designed to work in real time. Ghost hands help to achieve accuracy between the operator and the humanoid. However, handling the flying robots in space require proper practice and patience.

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